Minister English says  €44 million investment in Tara Mines is “a vote of confidence in Navan and in Meath”

Action Plan for Jobs, Bohermeen, Innovation, Jobs, Meath, Navan, Research, Research and Innovation

Monday, 16th January 2017

The official confirmation of news last week that the Swedish owners of
Tara Mines, Boliden, intend to invest €44 million in the facility to
allow operations to continue up to 2026 and secrue 700 local jobs is “a vote of confidence
in Navan and in Meath” according to local Fine Gael T.D. and Minister
for Housing and Urban Renewal Damien English. “This is a good day for
our town and County, and for the workers” he said.

As a former Minister for Skills, Research and innovation from 2014 to
2016, the local Minister also wished to emphasise and compliment the
role that collaborative research and innovation between Science
Foundation Ireland and industry partners like Boliden had played in
making the investment happen.

“Boliden are an industry collaborator with the Science Foundation
Ireland iCRAG Research Centre and this new exploration find was part
of their collaborative research efforts. This is a great example of
the significant impact on our local and national economy and jobs,
that can come from collaborative research.  We need more research like
this both locally and nationally to ensure we continue to future proof
our economy and make it fit for the challenges of the 21st century”
Minister English said.

“Whilst local authorities and Governments do not create jobs, they are
crucial players in creating the right environment for jobs and
investment to thrive.  In that respect the Boliden announcement is an
endorsement of our strategies locally and nationally to make Meath a
destination of choice to invest in, start a business in, and live in.
Such strategies include the Meath County Council Economic Development
Plan, the National and Regional Action Plans for Jobs, and Horizon
2020 – our new science strategy launched during my time in the
Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation” concluded Minister
English.

ENDS

Science Foundation Ireland and Pfizer announce exciting new R&D programme for Ireland

Action Plan for Jobs, Funding, Innovation, Jobs, Research, Research and Innovation

13th April 2016

Funding awarded to researchers in Ireland to find potential new therapies for patients of unmet needs

Science Foundation Ireland and Pfizer today announced the recipients of the 2016 SFI-Pfizer Biotherapeutics Innovation Award programme. The collaboration between Science Foundation Ireland and Pfizer provides qualified academic researchers with an opportunity to deliver important potential discoveries in the areas of immunology, oncology, cardiovascular and rare diseases.

Supported by the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, the SFI-Pfizer Biotherapeutics Innovation Award programme has awarded funding to researchers from across three academic institutions in Ireland including the Royal College Surgeons (RCSI), University College Cork (UCC) and University College Dublin (UCD).

In addition to the funding, academic researchers will have the unique opportunity to work with the Pfizer Global Biotherapeutics Technology (GBT) group, at Grangecastle in Dublin, as well as Pfizer’s R&D innovation engine, the Centers for Therapeutic Innovation. The teams’ research will focus on the application of cutting edge technologies for next generation protein therapies.

Speaking at the announcement, Mr Damien English, TD, Minister for Research, Skills and Innovation, said: “The collaboration between Science Foundation Ireland and Pfizer is an excellent example of how government, industry and academia can work together and share knowledge that could lead to the development of new medical breakthroughs not only for Irish patients but for patients worldwide. The Government continues to encourage and welcome programmes that offer opportunities in research and development in Ireland. Innovative partnerships and meaningful collaboration between industry and academia like this also help to build Ireland’s reputation internationally as a location for excellent scientific research.”

Commenting at the announcement, Prof Mark Ferguson, Director General of Science Foundation Ireland and Chief Scientific Adviser to the Government of Ireland said, “We are delighted to continue this successful partnership with Pfizer to support innovative research and development that could help deliver significant advances in critical areas of medical need. The success of the award programme is a reflection of the quality and relevance of academic scientific research in Ireland – excellence and impact.”

Commenting on the announcement, Dr. Paul Duffy, Vice President, Biopharmaceutical Operations and External Supply, Pfizer said, “Pfizer are delighted with the continued collaboration with Science Foundation Ireland. As an organisation we are focused on delivering innovative therapies that significantly improve patients’ lives and investment in early stage research is critical to achieving this. Collaborations between industry and academia remain key in helping to expedite the translation of scientific discoveries into breakthrough therapies that matter for patients in need.”

In 2015, five proposals representing four institutions across Ireland were awarded similar funding. Over the past year the researchers have worked in collaboration with Pfizer colleagues on potential new therapies for diseases including haemophilia, fibrosis, Motor Neuron Disease, psoriasis and Crohn’s disease. A number of these programmes are advancing and are on track to reaching their goals.

 

The recipients of the SFI-Pfizer Biotherapeutics Innovation Award are:

  • Prof Martin Steinhoff, University College Dublin – Prof Steinhoff leads a translational research team attempting to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying skin inflammation and associated chronic itch, for which there remains a significant unmet clinical need. The team hopes to generate targeting molecules that block the activation of key players in these inflammatory pathways.

 

  • Dr Anne Moore, University College Cork – The remit of Dr Moore’s group is to develop and translate innovative therapies that modulate immune function. Mounting evidence from recent clinical studies demonstrates that harnessing the body’s own immune response to kill tumour cells can be a very effective mechanism to treat cancer. This collaboration aims to develop a novel strategy that enhances the body’s natural anti-tumour response.

 

  • Dr Leonie Young and Prof Arnold Hill, Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland – Dr Young and Prof Arnold Hill are interested in the underlying mechanisms that control breast cancer resistance to traditional chemotherapeutics. Their aim is to use pre-clinical models, clinical datasets and breast cancer patient samples to better characterize, and effectively target, treatment resistant breast cancers.

 

END

– See more at: https://www.djei.ie/en/News-And-Events/Department-News/2016/April/13042016d.html#sthash.FlmlNOjn.pmjb6x4D.dpuf